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The Second Leg by the Numbers (better late than never)

June 3, 2013

We arrived in Charleston this past Monday around 8:30 AM, finishing the second, and final, leg of this Deepwater Canyons cruise. It was a successful venture and an exciting adventure. I have finally regained my ‘land legs’. Someone actually commented that people always talk about seasickness, but not what happens when you get off the ship: dock rock. This is a term for the sensation of still being at sea after getting on dry land; feeling the pitch and roll of the ship in the waves even though you are on stable ground. Many people tend to feel this when stationary or when they have their eyes closed. I was warned to be aware when washing shampoo out of my hair for the first time back on dry land. I didn’t fall in the shower, but for about two days, if I sat or stood still, I could feel the world rocking around me. It wasn’t an uneasy feeling necessarily, but noticeable nonetheless. Some people might actually have this sensation after any prolonged period in a moving vehicle (car, train, plane, etc.). Stand still and close your eyes after your next plane flight and see what happens.

I digress, here are the numbers:

15 Science team members

Preparing the Jason ROV for the end of operations on the ship. Image courtesy of Walt Gurley, Deepwater Canyons 2013 Expedition, NOAA-OER/BOEM/USGS.

Preparing the Jason ROV for the end of operations on the ship. Image courtesy of Walt Gurley, Deepwater Canyons 2013 Expedition, NOAA-OER/BOEM/USGS.

6 ROV dives

3 Shipwrecks photographed and videoed in High Definition

12.5 TB of video and still picture data (total for Leg 1 and Leg 2)

10 ROV crew (still)

200+ isotope samples

20 GB of multibeam sonar data

30 ship’s crew (still)

18,000 gallons of fuel burned

4 CTDs

4+ boxes of Frosted Mini-Wheats consumed

Photographer/Videographer Art Howard braving the elements to get shots off the bow during rough seas. Image courtesy of Walt Gurley, Deepwater Canyons 2013 Expedition, NOAA-OER/BOEM/USGS.

Photographer/Videographer Art Howard braving the elements to get shots off the bow during rough seas. Image courtesy of Walt Gurley, Deepwater Canyons 2013 Expedition, NOAA-OER/BOEM/USGS.

0 times seasick (personal best)

9 Mono cores

25,000 gallons of freshwater made and used

1 trawl

2,963 photos documenting the cruise

700 GB of video documenting the cruise

20 degree difference in air temperature between the lab and the ROV control van (still)

1 ‘gold whale’ collected and maintained

2 bags of un-shrunken wig heads and Styrofoam cups (we didn’t get a chance to shrink our Styrofoam materials)

Akel and Korey from the Jason crew taking in the last sunset on the ship.

Akel and Korey from the Jason crew taking in the last sunset on the ship. Image courtesy of Walt Gurley, Deepwater Canyons 2013 Expedition, NOAA-OER/BOEM/USGS.

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